Filipino Food, Anthony Bourdain and a Poet Named Janice (a Q&A)

The unexamined life is not worth living.” – Socrates

The poem, “For Filipina/x Americans Who See Themselves Thru Anthony Bourdain”, was published on The Offing, an online literary magazine, which publishes work that challenges and provokes. And that’s exactly what the poem written by Janice Lobo Sapigao does – it challenges and provokes.

Intrigued? We asked Janice what prompted her to write it and included the link to her poem below.

 But wait. Don’t scroll down just yet. Not before you meet Janice Sapigao. Janice is a Filipina writer, poet, and educator born and raised in San José, California. She is also one of the much-revered story and recipe contributors to our forthcoming Filipino Food anthology, My Food Beginnings.

janicesapigao-headshot
Janice Sapigao

Her first book of poetry, Microchips for Millions, about immigrant women in the Silicon Valley who make microchips, is launching this month.

Here’s a sneak peek:

microchip

An excerpt from Microchips for Millions:

microexcerpt

 

MFB: What was it like for you to grow up in the U.S.?

JS: This is a question that I still ask myself. As a Filipina American – and this is well-documented in my poetry and writings, just as it is in my Filipina American scholarship – I come up against questions about accessing language, culture, and information and I sit (not very well) with half-answers wondering about being, saying, or doing enough that depicts my past or changing identities.

I am still writing a novel entitled Where Did You Get All Those English From?, which seeks to answer so many questions regarding how I grew up within my household, and how I grew up in the US. I find traces of how I grew up in the following books and texts that, for me, describe very well the in-betweenness I felt:

  • The Babysitters Club series and The Babysitters Club Little Sister series by Ann M. Martin
  • Her Wild American Self by M. Evelina Galang
  • Pinay Power edited by Melinda DeJesus
  • Gabi, A Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
  • The Madonnas of Echo Park by Brando Skyhorse
  • Homebound by Yen Le Espiritu
  • Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
  • Miss Universe by Ruby Veridiano-Ching

 

MFB: What prompted you to write the poem, For Filipina/x Americans Who See Themselves Thru Anthony Bourdain? What did you want readers to take away from it?

JS:My poem, “For Filipina/x Americans Who See Themselves Thru Anthony Bourdain,” was published in an online literary journal I love, The Offing. The Offing seeks out work by writers who are often marginalized in literary spaces – which is important because many Filipina/x writers write out of these spaces. I love that my poem was published during 2016 Filipina/x American History Month.

I wrote it because I saw that, in Spring 2016, a lot of folks were re-posting and re-tweeting links about chef Anthony Bourdain’s trip to the Philippines in late 2015. I’m always weary of travelogues, travel shows, and people (celebrities and everyday people – even my own friends or acquaintances) who make tourism and traveling a sport. I’m weary and critical about these things because the consumption of food and culture is inherently linked to (often unchecked) privilege. I think that, if anything, checking one’s privilege allows folks to think about who they are, where they are, and most importantly, who they are not.

Why do Filipina/xs extend care or pride or see themselves when a white male chef is whitesplaining ourselves and culture back to us?

anthonybourdain
Photo Credit: Anthony Bourdain-Parts Unknown

I wrote the poem because, as social media friends were seeing the Philippines through Bourdain’s eyes – or Bourdain’s camera – I took (and still take) issue with the newfound or renewed sense of pride in being / being from the Philippines. Bourdain himself wrote, “It’s not even about Filipinos — as my experience, however intimate, is limited in the extreme.” I appreciate and respect Bourdain for writing that in the article that accompanies the full episode, because, it is so true! It is limited, Bourdain. Which means, yes, ours as viewers is limited, too. I wonder, why do Filipina/xs extend care or pride or see themselves when a white male chef is whitesplaining ourselves and culture back to us?

I want readers to think about these particular lines from the poem:

“Why drum the remote to find home.

 Why not drive the knife into the accent

 they baked for you.

 Why not julienne the blessing with your bare hands.”

 

MFB: Based on your observations/experiences, how are Filipinos and Filipino food viewed in America?

JS: I wonder if this is where I should talk about halo-halo with soft tofu, popcorn, and gummy bears, and energy drinks, or ube as the newest flavor after green tea and coconut.

I wonder if this is where I offer an opinion on white people doing Filipino food pop-ups or food trucks.

I wonder if this is where I reflect on white folks eating tilapia on banana leaves with a spoon and fork.

I think about point-point (turo-turo) restaurants, or point-point restaurants at markets, and how I love them so, but cannot, and wish I could, order in Tagalog or Ilokano.

I think about my Auntie Luz, in Maui, who knows so many people who work at the Maui Flea Market. I think about how we both talked with the Ilokano workers at the Maui lavender farm, as they crouched down pulling weeds while we sat on a bench.

I think about how my step-dad had dreams of opening up his own restaurant once he arrived in America. And the shame I felt when I was little, and insisted that our family eat at McDonald’s or In-N-Out instead of at a Filipino restaurant that closed six months after it opened in Milpitas (6+1, I still remember you!). We got our food in the drive-thru lane that day, and my step-dad took his Big Mac only to put it in our refrigerator for later eating (or throwing away).

I think about how, every week for two years, I bought all of my groceries at Seafood City (a supermarket chain specializing in Filipino & other Asian goods)at Eagle Rock Plaza.

All of these moments thread together the present and simultaneously fleeting. These are my memories that are telling about my exact thoughts on how Filipinos and Filipino food is viewed in America.

MFB: If you could only have one Filipino dish for the rest of your life, what would it be and why?

JS:Filipino breakfast! Filipino breakfast is so versatile! It’ll always include rice, some (sweet meat) protein, and fried, runny eggs. I like it with diced tomato and onion.

longsilog

LongSiLog (Longanisa, Sinangag, Itlog) Photo credit: bhearsum

I could eat a late night meal or breakfast from any of the following places: Coffee Adventure in Milpitas, CA, or Tselogs in Daly City, CA; or Lucky Chances in Colma, CA; or Toppings Tree in Santa Clara, CA; or LA Rose Café in Los Angeles.

*Janice Sapigao is one of the contributing authors of our upcoming book, My Food Beginnings – a collection of Filipino food memoirs. 

Connect with Janice Sapigao:

 Website: www.janicewrites.com

 

by Jacqueline Lauri of My Food Beginnings – a Filipino food anthology project

Bringing people together through food and stories

Like us on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter.http://www.twitter.com/mfb_anthology

 

 

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Filipino Food, Anthony Bourdain and a Poet Named Janice (a Q&A)

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